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Common Sense - Thomas Paine

PERHAPS the sentiments contained in the following pages, are not yet sufficiently fashionable to procure them general favor; a long habit of not thinking a thing wrong, gives it a superficial appearance of being right, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defence of custom. But tumult soon subsides. Time makes more converts than reason.

As a long and violent abuse of power is generally the means of calling the right of it in question, (and in matters too which might never have been thought of, had not the sufferers been aggravated into the inquiry,) and as the king of England hath undertaken in his own right, to support the parliament in what he calls theirs, and as the good people of this country are grievously oppressed by the combination, they have an undoubted privilege to inquire into the pretensions of both, and equally to reject the usurpations of either.

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Adam Smith: The Wealth of Nations
Monday, 23 November 2009 23:08

Lus annual labour of every nation is the fund which originally supplies it with all the necessaries and conveniences of life which it annually consumes, and which consist always either in the immediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations.

According, therefore, as this produce, or what is purchased with it, bears a greater or smaller proportion to the number of those who are to consume it, the nation will be better or worse supplied with all the necessaries and conveniencies for which it has occasion.

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The Law
Written by Frederic Bastiat   
Sunday, 22 November 2009 01:25

 The Law, a book authored by French economist, politician and political theorist Frederic Bastiat was originally published as a pamphlet in the final year of Bastiat's life having died in December of 1850 while suffering from tuberculosis. The Law, originally written in French during a time when France was rapidly turning into complete Socialism was entitled La Loi, the book has been translated into English, published several times since its original pamphlet form and has more recently been made widely available via various outlets on the Internet. Frederic Bastiat did much of his writing after The French Revolution in 1848 and produced several other famous works one of which illuminates the hidden costs of destroying other peoples' property using the now famous "Broken Window Fallacy"; this less famous essay is entitled "That Which Is Seen, That Which Is Unseen".

The United States is now unfortunately afforded the opportunity in history to read this classical work of Liberty again and to use it as a wake up call of their own. The people shall use it to remember the principles the founder's of these United States embodied in the first American Revolution. The principles that brought men together to pledge their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor, to defend their natural rights granted to them by their creator and to declare their independence from the grips of a despotic government.

As Bastiat writes, "May they reject all systems, and try liberty; for liberty is an acknowledgment of faith in God and His works."

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